Ember and Sugar are the two main reasons I often see chukars fly away rather than drop to the ground when I shoot.  When I see this mother daughter team of Weimarieners go on point together, it is just too tempting for me to try to get a picture of them. Often I try to get a picture and a shot at birds.  This sometimes works, but most often birds get too much of a jump on me, while I fumble around trying to get camera in pocket and gun to aim. It’s worth it though.

I normally try to get in front of the girls to get a picture, so that if birds do flush, (I make birds  nervous with my photo fidgeting) it was my fault and not the dogs.  After all, it is my job to flush birds not theirs. They are pointers. Sure, I have to endure dirty looks from the girls at time. But they don’t hold a grudge, and soon forget all about it, as they get their noses back to the ground again.

My best success is when I can use only one hand to snap a picture, as it is faster to put the camera into my pocket afterwards. This allows me to have my gun in a better position to more quickly get it into shooting action. It is when I have to use two hands for picture-taking, that costs me more in positioning time. It means I have to put my gun under an armpit or between my legs, to better hold the camera.  Somehow, chukars always seem to know when a gunner is at the most compromised situation, before they jump to the sky.

Fortunately, I do not measure a successful chukar hunt by numbers of birds on the ground.  Sharing some great times with the girls out in the majestic landscapes of chukar world, watching them do what they do best, is a real treat for me.

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