What Is The Frontier?

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Which frontier? The last frontier? The first? Yesterday’s, today’s, tomorrow’s?  No matter what kind of frontier one might think about, the one thing they all have in common is “place.”   Whether physical or mental, they represent a special place that we can go to.  They all provide great value because they are bound by horizons, which help define a goal of where we can travel to and push understanding forward. Each boundary has an edge where the “event horizon” falls off into the unknown. So frontiers might best be appreciated by their representation of where we can go to ponder the unknowable. Beyond the edge is where potential for new knowledge resides: a transition zone for transition zone where ignorance can be changed into understanding.

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Not knowing, is the carrot that keeps us jumping for that shinny object of our obsessions. It is innate curiosity that propels us through life, always wondering what the next event will be, or when we will reach our final one. Then what?  We may cross the line into the knowable, and then again, perhaps not. Only when we die will we know, or not know.  By definition, the unknown is precisely that. Something that can never be known. Knowing the unknowable does not qualify. The real unknown can never be reached or appreciated by those who know.

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What does it matter if we know or not? Or that there is or is not any kind of frontier? Some people might claim that it matters for its own sake. That is to say, like  mountain climbers who say they scale the mountain because it is there. Or people who say it is wise to save animals from extinction even if they seem to have no value to humans, but for their own sake. As I was thinking about the value of saving wildlife for their own sake, a lone coyote began howling in the wind. It seemed to be speaking directly to me and I was reminded of my synchronicity project with those sentient others whom I share the environment with.

wolf energy

I write down the timing of natural events that happen simultaneously, or nearly so, with my own thinking that seems to be  linked to some kind of meaningful message.  Is it confirmation bias? Possibly. Does it matter? After all, are we not all biased towards many things in our lives?  No one can stand at the tip of their tall forever, they must succumb to some kind of lean eventually.  The important thing is to question our lean and the why of which direction it is in. Are the messages from god, nature,  myself, or nowhere at all? And what difference does it make?n fk payette june 17, 2013 040

The more number of people that can find themselves leaning towards the green of nature, the better is the potential for us to save the blue  planet from the more nefarious side of ourselves.  Any kind of frontier is a concept, and out there, somewhere.  How we choose to engage it matters. Do we gobble it up, or only eat part of it and leave more for others and the future? Our treatment of “place” has consequences. Every voice counts, as much as any rock can start an avalanche.

 PBD

 

Our internalized frontiers are affected by what we say to ourselves, and are important because they give rise to what we externalize and thus ripple out to impact the natural frontiers.

 

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Salmon With Feathers

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If one was to track down the DNA of a salmon, that is, it’s true signature, they would be astounded by where all it has been and eventually ends up.  It might seem that when a spawning salmon dies, the river bed is where if finally  ends up. Wrong. The salmon becomes food for many organisms once it is dead and is far more reaching than one might first imagine.

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How so? Well,  dead fish often end up in other places than just  the waters from where they came.  For example:  when a bear eats a dead spawned out salmon, it may drag it into the woods.  So, the carcass of the dead fish itself then becomes food for land organisms that may also eat on it.   Or a bear may  defecate  in the woods, leaving nutrients that plants eat to make berries.  In turn, the berries are eaten by birds.  Interestingly, new genetic studies indicate that feathers of birds can contain some dna chain of the salmon’s signature.

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So a salmon’s signature can be found in many places.  Simplifying natural processes comes with great difficulty when  deciphering ecological tracks and using various tools to measure them by. But now, with the science of genetics, we have yet another tool to help trace movements of fundamental elements that are vital to keep ecological cycles pure and functioning properly. With more sophisticated technologies comes ever more simplified revelations of the elemental. We may use telescopes and microscopes to see beyond the naked eye, but in the end everything is simply just a part of something else.

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